Fishing For Bargains In The Market Carnage (UK MARKETS)

deep sea fish

Disclaimer: All financial recommendations in the article are those of the author and should not be taken as financial advice. It is best to do your own research before investing in any security or to speak with a financial advisor. 

The market crash since February has been painful for all long term investors. Yet at the same time it has presented opportunities to buy several good quality stocks and securities at a lower price than normal. In this article I will focus on some of those, which I think may be worth a look at.

Travel Industry

Lots of the big multi billion pound FTSE 100 blue chip companies are currently trading at much lower valuations than before the crash. One of the industries most affected by the current coronavirus pandemic has been the travel industry, which includes airline and cruise ship stocks.

On the FTSE 100, three companies springs to mind; International Airlines (IAG), EasyJet (EZJ) and Carnival (CCL). The share prices of all three companies have been heavily impacted and currently look very cheap. However, as cheap as they may be, they now carry a lot of risk as there’s no guarantee that, despite their size, they will have enough cash to see them through this difficult period before they are back to operating at normal capacity again.

International Airlines group owns multiple airlines in its portfolio including British Airways, Iberia, Aer Lingus and the low cost airline Vueling. Out of the three companies, this one is in my view the safest bet if I had to chose, which one I would invest in. The principle reason for this is, because of the fact that it owns multiple airlines rather than just one. Furthermore, it also employs the greatest number of people (over 60,000) and it is likely, although not guaranteed, that it would be at the receiving end of a government bailout should it really struggle to remain a going concern in the coming weeks and months. Allowing the firm to go bust, would result in a lot of people out of work.

Easyjet carries more risk than International Airlines. Although it has decent cash reserves, it has entered into an agreement with Airbus for £4.5bn to purchase 107 aircrafts. Considering that Easyjet’s current market cap is less than half that amount, such a transaction puts the company in a very difficult situation at a time when precious cash reserves are king. Unless the company scraps the Airbus deal and temporarily suspends it’s dividend, it runs the risk of becoming insolvent in no time and is unlikely to be bailed out either.

But Easyjet is not the riskiest of the three. That prize would go to cruise ship company Carnival. In the wake of all the well publicized coronavirus cases occurring on cruise ships, I cannot see that industry recovering for at least several months. Unlike flights, which are a necessity, it is not a necessity to take a cruise. It’s share price has reacted accordingly falling from a 52 week high of £41.75 in May 2019 to a 52 week low of just £6.06 earlier this month. The share price is currently £8.69. If the company wants to ride out this crisis, it will need to embark on some pretty substantial cost cutting measures going beyond simply cutting the dividend. Earlier this month, the company increased it’s borrowings to give it more financial flexibility, but the consequence of this is that the company has got itself into debt even more.

Personally, I would think very carefully about investing in either company as cheap as the shares may be. The trick is to find high quality blue chip stocks that are beaten down, but fundamentally have a robust enough margin of safety that will see it through the worst of a crisis without having to resort to options such as taking on more debt or any kind of dilutive rights issue.

Oil and Gas Industry

The other industry that has taken a hammering is the oil and gas (o&g) industry. As the market crash began to develop steam, the price of oil fell a whopping 30% in just one day. Towards the end of March, the two largest UK listed oil and gas companies, Royal Dutch Shell (RDSB) and BP (BP.), were both trading at discounts of more than 50% of their share prices at the start of the year. As I write this, their share prices have recovered a bit off their recent lows, yet they still have a way to go to reach their previous levels from the beginning of the year.

I think o&g prices will be incredibly volatile over the new few years and long after the worst of this current coronavirus pandemic is over. Even though o&g prices may currently be at very low levels, it doesn’t take much for prices to suddenly spike again in very little time. In the coming weeks and possibly months, o&g prices may continue to stay low or go even lower to lows that are unthinkable. When investing in o&g companies, especially when prices are low, it is always important to invest in companies that have very low production costs and/or a large downstream business. Such companies are able to weather lower o&g prices better than those that are either producers with high production costs or worse o&g exploration companies.  The latter are much more vulnerable to lower o&g prices and a prolonged slump in these prices can have a very real existential impact on these businesses as their operations become economically unviable.

For those reasons, I am attracted to the more solid players in this industry who will be able to get through this challenging period the best. I already mentioned the two main players, Shell and BP. Their share price erosion has now meant that both companies now pay even higher dividends. Yet there is always the very real possibility that these dividends get temporarily cut, which I actually think is a good thing in the short run if only to boost essential cash reserves. There is currently a lot of negative sentiment in the o&g industry and its not a popular industry. I have a contrarian mindset towards this industry and believe that in due course there will come a time when o&g prices will be much higher than their current levels.

Consumer brands companies

There are some consumer brands companies that are presently very under-priced. A neglected industry that immediately springs to mind is the tobacco industry. Like the oil and gas industry, it is a very unpopular industry and sentiment continues to be poor. What I find interesting is that whilst sentiment has been poor for some years now, there was a period not so long ago where there was a lot of hype in the nascent cannabis industry. I recall the share prices of exotic hot Canadian pot players such as Tilray ascend to ridiculous valuations that were very debased from their fundamentals. I fortunately stayed well clear of all the hype and I am glad that I did as today the current share price of Tilray is a mere fraction of what it was at the apex of the hype.

Rather than chase these hot pot plays, there was and is far more value to be had investing in some of the large public tobacco companies such as British American Tobacco (BATS) or Imperial Brands (IMB). Both companies have been depressed for some time and currently pay very large dividends. In the case of Imperial, it’s dividend is now more than 10%. In the current economic turmoil we are all experiencing, there is no guarantee that these dividends will not be cut, yet I remain certain that the share price of these companies will recover. Whilst it is true that less people are smoking traditional cigarettes than before, these companies will increasingly become entities where they do not have all their eggs in one basket. Going back to the much hyped cannabis industry; who’s to say that once cannabis becomes increasingly legalised in a growing number of jurisdictions across the world and there is more robust consolidation in this industry, those large players don’t also get a piece of the action?

I am also interested in those large consumer brands companies of essential products. The two biggest ones on the FTSE 100 are Unilever (ULVR) and Reckitt Benckiser (RB.). Both are global, robust and defensive non cyclical companies. Yet there is one smaller company, which I think offers a lot of upside to long term investors. This company is called PZ Cussons (PZC). It has been undervalued for a while now and currently has a total market cap of less than £1bn, which I think is very cheap. What’s more, it is well exposed to emerging markets with high growth potential. It is best known for owning the Imperial Leather soap brand and also the Carex brand too. This is important to know since as this current coronavirus pandemic has escalated there has been an acute shortage of hand sanitiser products. Carex is one of the leading producers of hand sanitisers in the world and whilst it may not have a monopoly, I expect record sales for PZ Cussons’ Carex brand when their next financial report covering the last few months is published.

Index Funds and Investment Trusts

Rather than focus on picking individual company stocks, I also like looking at index funds that track entire stock markets and also well run investment trusts. Investing in index funds is ideal for those who don’t want to invest in individual companies and undertake all the fundamental analysis that goes with it. What’s more, by investing in a small select number of index funds rather than lots of individual stocks, you are also cutting down on your dealing costs, which can eat into precious cash.

In the UK, the two principle stock markets are the FTSE 100 and the FTSE 250. The FTSE 100 contains the largest 100 UK companies by market capitalisation and the FTSE 250 the next round of large UK companies, which are not part of the FTSE 100. The FTSE 250 companies, although smaller than the FTSE 100 ones, have generally more growth potential. Yet what the FTSE 100 companies may lack in the growth potential of the FTSE 250 ones, they make up for by paying generally larger dividends. Both indexes are trading at vast discounts to their levels befor the start of the crash. If you are a long term investor, buying some units in both a FTSE 100 and FTSE 250 index fund at current levels could be a very smart move. One could also slowly drip feed money on a weekly or monthly basis. This may also be a good move if these markets continue to fall before they recover.

I have selected a few LSE listed investment trusts, which I consider sound and well managed. One investment trust which I recommend more for income than growth and is currently trading at quite a discount is the City Of London Investment Trust (CTY). It consists mainly of large multi billion pound FTSE 100 companies paying good dividends and thus the trust pays a decent dividend. Some of these companies have temporarily halted their dividend payouts and that is I feel reflected in their current share prices. I expect this trust though to recover strongly when the markets recover and for the companies in the trust that have cut their dividends to reinstate them. The trust also has one of the lowest fees in the industry.

Another LSE listed investment trust I like which is focused more on smaller FTSE 250 companies is the Henderson Smaller Companies Investment Trust (HSL). This trust also pays a dividend although its smaller than what CTY pays and the trust’s fees are also higher. However it has much more potential for growth, without it being reckless.

Both CTY and HSL are currently trading at discounts of more than 30% of their January highs.

The Templeton Emerging Markets Investment Trust (TEM) is also trading at a large discount and is one of the best trusts invested in some of the largest emerging markets comapnies in the world. I prefer this trust over ones focused on just single emerging market countries and I recommend drip buying on any dips in this current downturn.

Finally, I am always keeping an eye on the largest LSE listed investment trust by market cap, the Scottish Mortgage Investment Trust (SMT). This trust contains many high growth companies in its portfolio from holdings in some of the largest tech companies in the world to several promising unlisted companies. NASDAQ listed tech stocks have been some of the best performing stocks during the ten year plus bull market. However it remains to be seen whether the next ten years will be equally generous to these companies. Like other stocks, SMT has also suffered during the current downturn although its held up better than others. I have included this trust as although I still think it is rather richly valued, it may wobble more over the coming months and could present a very good buying opportunity for the long term.

Precious Metals

I continue to remain very bullish on precious metals. In particular, gold and silver. Rather than typical investments to make money, precious metals for me are a form of insurance in a world simply awash in debt, cheap money and uber low interest rates. One of my biggest fears is the effect all this accumulated debt will eventually have on the world’s major currencies, especially the US dollar. Several economists are predicting many years of deflation and sustained low or even negative interest rates, but I beg to differ and think that all this debt and enormous current stimulus packages to soften the blows inflicted by the current coronavirus pandemic could likely lead to inflation rearing its ugly head. As I explained in my previous articles, this will lead to central banks raising interest rates and all this outstanding global debt becoming more expensive to service.

All these factors considered I think gold will do very well over the coming years and even from its current high levels, I don’t think the price is expensive. Silver, on the other hand, is very cheap compared to gold and perhaps for value investors, there is more upside and an even stronger case for silver. I like silver very much for those reasons and think it could rally much harder than gold.

Regarding investment opportunities for exposure to both metals, I think the best mining companies are the biggest ones, Barrick Gold and Newmont Mining, which are both listed on the Toronto and New York stock exchanges. I am not so keen on the smaller mining companies with high production costs and too much exposure to politically unstable countries. One can of course buy physical gold and silver from a dealer and keep it in a vault. Bear in mind though that storing silver, especially in modest amounts, will be more costly than storing gold. I like very much gold and silver ETFs, which are backed by physical bullion in a vault. It is very important that each unit of such an ETF is directly backed to a portion of the physical metal in a vault. Two precious metal ETF securities I recommend are the Wisdom Tree Physical Gold ETF (PHGP) and the Wisdom Tree Physical Silver ETF (PHSP).

 

By Nicholas Peart

(c)All Rights Reserved 

 

Image: PublicDomainPictures

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